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Full text of "Summary of activities during 1975"

f-3 



9 ^l h So^i.m eSS } COMMITTEE PEINT 



SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES DURING 1975 



COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES 
UNITED STATES SENATE 
94th CONGRESS 
FIRST SESSION .tlt'''"'''''^ 



W 












AUGUST 1976 



Printed for the use of the Committee on Armed Seryices 



U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
WASHINGTON : 1976 



COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES 

JOHN C. STENNIS, Mississippi, Chairman 



STUART SYMINGTON, Missouri 
HENRY M. JACKSON, Washington 
HOWARD W. CANNON, Nevada 
THOMAS J. McINTYRE, New Hampshire 
HARRY F. BYRD, Jr., Virginia 
SAM NUNN, Georgia 
JOHN C. CULVER, Iowa 
GARY HART, Colorado 
PATRICK J. LEAHY, Vermont 



STROM THURMOND, South Carolina 
JOHN TOWER, Texas 
BARRY GOLD WATER, Arizona 
WILLIAM L. SCOTT, Virginia 
ROBERT TAFT, Jr., Ohio 
DEWEY F. BARTLETT, Oklahoma 



T. Edward Braswell, Jr., Chief Counsel and Staff Director 
John* T. Ticer, Chief Clerk 



(H) 



CONTENTS 



Pate 

Introduction by the Chairman 1 

Jurisdiction •' 

Membership of the committee ( j 

Subcommittee appointments 7 

Relationship of annual authorization to Department of Defense appropria- 
tions •' 

Legislation reported by the committee 12- 

Legislation reported and enacted into public law: 

To authorize appropriations during the fiscal year 1976, and the period 
of July 1, 1976, through September 30, 1976, for procurement of 
aircraft, missiles, tracked combat vehicles, torpedoes, and other 
weapons, and research, development, test, and evaluation for the 
Armed Forces, and to prescribe the authorized personnel strength 
for each active duty component and the Selected Reserve of each 
Reserve component of the Armed Forces and of civilian personnel of 
the Department of Defense, and to authorize the military training 
student loads, and for other purposes (Public Law 94-106, H.R. 
6674, October 7, 1975) 12 

To authorize certain construction at military installations, and for 

other purposes (Public Law 94-107, S. 1247, October 7, 1975) 25 

Legislation reported but not enacted into public law: 

To authorize the appointment of Alexander P. Butterfield to the 

retired list of the Regular Air Force, and for other purposes (S. 182) _ 28 

To extend, pending international agreement, the fisheries management 
responsibilit}^ and authority of the United States over the fish in 
certain areas in order to conserve and protect such fish from deple- 
tion, and for other purposes (S. 961) 28 

To make the provisions of section 1331(e) of title 10, United States 

Code, retroactive to November 1, 1953 (S. 2090) 28 

To amend title 37, United States Code, relating to special pay for 

nuclear qualified officers, and for other purposes (S. 2114) 28 

To amend chapter 39 of title 10, United States Code, to enable the 
President to authorize the involuntary order to active duty of 
Selected Reservists, for a limited period, whether or not a declara- 
tion of war or national emergencv has been declared (S. 2115) 28 

To amend sections 5202 and 5232 of title 10, United States Code, 
relating to the appointment to the grades of general and lieutanant 
general of Marine Corps officers designated for appropriate higher 
commands or for performance of duties of great importance and 
responsibility (S. 2117) 29 

To fully explore and develop the naval petroleum reserves of the 
United States and to permit limited production with revenues 
derived therefrom to be placed in a special account, and for other 
purposes (S. 2173) 29 

To amend the National Security Act of 1947, as amended, to include 
the Secretary of the Treasurv as a member of the National Security 

Council (S. 2350) 29 

Resolutions reported : 

Relating to the establishment of the naval and maritime museum in 

Charleston, South Carolina (S. Con. Res. 9) 30 

Authorizing additional expenditures by the Committee on Armed 

Services for inquiries and investigations (S. Res. 87) 30 

Authorizing additional expenditures by the Committee on Armed 

Services for routine purposes (S. Res. 88) 30 

Disapproving construction projects on the island of Diego Garcia 

(S. Res. 160) 30 

(in) 



IV 

Additional resolution adopted: Page 
To commend James R. Schlesinger for his service as Secretary of 

Defense (S. Res. 303) 30 

Investigations, hearings, and other matters not directly pertaining to 

legislation before the committee 32 

Committee staff 33 

Rules of procedure 34 

Publications 37 

Hearings 37 

Reports 38 

Nominat ions 39 

Committee prints 39 

Nominations referred to committee 40 

Nominations for promotions in the Armed Forces 41 

Information regarding appointment of Boards of Visitors to the United 

States Military, Naval, and Air Force Academies 42 



INTRODUCTION BY THE CHAIRMAN 

Since 19G9, the Senate Committee on Armed Services has published 
an annual summary of its activities to serve as a historical record for 
the members of the Committee and the Senate. In 1970 the Legislative 
Reorganization Act was passed with a requirement that similar activ- 
ity reports be filed by each Committee every Congress. In specific, the 
act requires that : 

Each Committee of the Senate shall submit * * * a report 
on the activities of that Committee (with regard to) review 
and study, on a continuing basis, (of) the application, ad- 
ministration, and executive of those laws, or parts of laws, the 
subject matter of which is within the jurisdiction of that 
Committee. 

This report will provide a summary of the legislative and oversight 
activities of the Senate Armed Services Committee during the first 
session of the 94th Congress. 

The Authorization Process 

Each year the Senate Armed Services Committee considers the 
authorization request for Department of Defense appropriations. This 
is the principal method by which the Committee reviews our national 
defense program. The Committee's authorizing authority has devel- 
oped significantly since 1959. In that year Section 412 (b) of the mili- 
tary construction authorization bill proposed an authorization require- 
ment for the procurement of aircraft, missiles, and naval vessels. The 
Committee felt that "a thorough examination of this area of activity 
may serve to reduce the enormous cost of defense," and that such an 
examination would assist the Appropriations Committees in its delib- 
erations on the defense budget. 1 

Since 1959 the Committee's authority has been expanded to cover 
more, specific parts of the defense budget. For example, in 1962 and 
1963 section 412 (b) was amended to include authorization require- 
ments for research, development, test and evaluation. The Committee 
had found that adequate consideration of weapons procurement pro- 
grams was not possible without parallel consideration of the related 
research and development programs. Further amendments to section 
412 (b) were added in 1965, 1969, and 1970 extending the authorization 
review to the procurement of tracked combat vehicles, small arms and 
artillery, and torpedoes. 

In 1967 the Committee's authority was extended to the area of de- 
fense manpower. From 1967 through 1973 section 412 was amended to 
require Committee authorization of the Selected Reserve, active duty 
military and civilian manpower levels for the Department of Defense, 
as well as the average military student training loads. This authority. 



Senate Report S6-296. S6th Congress, 1st session, May 19, 1959, p. 16. 

(1) 



together with that for weapons acquisition, has enabled the Committee 
to develop a broad view of national defense needs and problems. 

This broad-ranging authority over defense programs often enables 
the Committee to combine its legislative and investigative functions. 
For example, in the determination of the manpower levels needed in 
each of the military services, the Committee will study the preceived 
threat and our present capabilities. Then it will examine the planned 
changes in the overall force structure, particularly such things as the 
relation of the addition of new ships and aircraft to any requested in- 
creases in manpower levels. Such a review may reveal problems in 
force composition or manpower management. The Committee will 
further examine any such problems to see if the requested levels should 
be altered and then make its recommendation to the Senate. 

In 1975, the Committee's consideration of the Military Authoriza- 
tion Bill for fiscal year 1976 and the Transition Quarter focused on 
the President's request in view of the significant increase in the size of 
the forces of the Soviet Union as well as the shrinking size of the U.S. 
defense dollar. The Committee made a thorough examination of the 
request in some 46 days of full Committee and Subcommittee hearings. 
The printed testimony covered some 5,700 pages in ton volumes. Ex- 
amination of the printed testimony will show the extensive, detailed 
review conducted by the full committee and its subcommittees on Re- 
search and Development, Tactical Air Power, and Manpower and 
Personnel. 

The Committee recommended reductions of $4.8 billion in the au- 
thorization request for fiscal year 1976 and $500 million in the request 
for the Transition Quarter. This bill was accepted by the Senate with 
minor changes. However, after conference with the House of Repre- 
sentatives, the Senate would not accept the conference report on the 
bill. Thus it was necessary to return to conference and negotiate a 
lower funding level. The final result was a bill authorizing $25.5 billion 
in procurement and research and development funds for fiscal year 
1976, $500 million above the Committee's original recommendation. 
The Transition Quarter funding level remained the same. The Com- 
mittee's recommended reduction of 18.000 in active military man- 
power was partially restored (9,000) in conference. The recommended 
reduction of 23,000 civilians was sustained in conference. 

The new Congressional budget process began in 1975. In delibera- 
tions on the military authorization fiscal and budgetary constraints 
were an important consideration. The Committee fully supported the 
Congressional budgetary process and the concurrent resolutions on the 
budget throughout the authorization process. 

Reporting Requirements 

A second way to review the application, administration and execu- 
tion of laws required by the Legislative Reorganization Act is through 
reporting requirements. The Committee periodically receives reports 
from the Secretary of Defense, the Secretaries of the military depart- 
ments and the Comptroller General on subjects which deserve continu- 
ing congressional attention. For example, the process of acquisition of 
certain major weapon systems is monitored by a quarterly reporting 
system established in 1909. 

During the course of the authorization process the Committee often 
discovers areas which it feels are in need of further investigation. 



Special reports may be requested in these areas. For example, in 197-") 
the Committee requested a special study by the Secretary of Defense 
on long-term basing alternatives in the Pacific Such a report will assist 
the Committee in its deliberations and decisions on our overseas troop 
deployments. 

Also in 1975, the Committee became increasingly concerned with the 
effects of foreign military sales on the transfer of major equipment 
from U.S. active inventories- The Committee included a provision in 
the Military Authorization Act to require reports on all such sales 
or transfers in amounts over $25,000,000. Such a report should better 
enable the Committee to advise the Senate on the military propriety 
of these sales. 

Briefings and Investigations 

Xon-legislative investigations are another important part of the 
Committee's oversight of our national security program. These include 
full committee, subcommittee, individual Senator and committee staff 
investigations into matters of public concern. In 1975 the Committee 
held an informal discussion on the Middle East situation with the 
Israeli Defense Minister Shimon Peres. In February, the Subcommit- 
tee on Arms Control held hearings on Soviet compliance with the 
SALT I agreements. Another area of interest was the growing Soviet 
presence in the Indian Ocean. On this matter Senator Dewey Bartlett 
and committee staff traveled to Somalia to investigate the Soviet instal- 
lation in Berbera. Also, each year the Committee receives briefings 
from the government intelligence agencies. All of these investigations 
and briefings increase the Committee's understanding of national 
security affairs and better enable it to oversee national defense pro- 
grams and policies. 

Nominations 

Another important method of review is the nomination process. In 
1975, the Committee acted upon 16 top-level nominations which were 
later confirmed by the Senate. The Committee considers such nomina- 
tions for the Department of Defense and the Central Intelligence 
Agency. 

Following favorable Committee reports, Martin R. Hoffmann was 
confirmed as Secretary of the Army, Thomas C. Reed was confirmed as 
Secretary of the Air Force, Donald Rumsfeld was confirmed as Secre- 
tary of Defense and Lieutenant General Louis Wilson was confirmed 
as commandant of the Marine Corps. In addition over 68,000 nomina- 
tions were routinely considered by the Commit 1 ee. 

The Work of Subcommittees 

The Subcommittees of the Senate Armed Services Committee always 
play a vital part in the Committee's work. The Subcommittees on 
Tactical Air Power, Research and Development, and Manpower and 
Personnel spent long hours examining the appropriate portions of the 
defense authorization budget, greatly enhancing the full Committee's 
ability to make constructive recommendations to the Senate. 

The Military Construction Subcommittee thoroughly reviewed the 
military construction authorization request for approximately $3 bil- 
lion. This is one of the major items handled by the Committee annually. 



The other Subcommittees also deal with matters vital to the work 
of the full Committee and are to be commended for their hard and 
productive work. As matters of national security and international 
affairs become more and more complex, I wish to commend the Mem- 
bers and staff of the Senate Armed Services Committee for their hard 
work both in Committee and on the floor of the Senate. 

John C. Stexxis, Chairman. 



JURISDICTION 

The Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 (Public Law 601 of the 
Seventy-ninth Congress, approved August 2, 1946, amended by Public 
Law 91-510 approved Oct. 26, 1970) in Part I created the standing 
Committees of the Senate and provided that the Committee on Armed 
Services should consist of 13 Senators; amended by S. Res. 18 of the 
82d Congress (1953) to consist of 15 Senators; amended by S. Res. 24 
of the 86th Congress (1959) to consist of 17 Senators; amended by 
S. Res. 11 of the 90th Congress (1967) to consist of 18 Senators: 
amended by P.L. 91-510 (1970) to consist of 15 Senators: further 
amended by S. Res. 15, of the 92d Congress to consist of 16 Senators; 
further amended by S. Res. 10 of the 93d Congress (1973) to consist 
of 15 Senators ; and further amended by S. Res. 17 of the 94th Congress 
to consist of 16 Senators and that to said committee shall be referred 
all proposed legislation, messages, petitions, memorials, and other 
matters relating to the following subjects: (Rule XXV (d) of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate.) 

1. Common defense generally. 

2. The Department of Defense, the Department of the Army, the 
Department of the Navy, and the Department of the Air Force, 
generally. 

3. Soldiers' and sailors' homes. 

4. Pa}', promotion, retirement, and other benefits and privileges of 
members of the Armed Forces. 

5. Selective service. 

6. Size and composition of the Army, Navy, and Air Force. 

7. Forts, arsenals, military reservations, and navy yards. 

8. Ammunition depots. 

9. Maintenance and operation of the Panama Canal, including the 
administration, sanitation, and Government of the Canal Zone. 

10. Conservation, development, and use of naval petroleum and 
oil-shale reserves. 

11. Strategic and critical materials necessary for the common 
defense. 

12. Aeronautical and space activities peculiar to or primarily associ- 
ated with the development of weapons systems or military operations 

(5) 



69-S39— 76- 



COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES 



John C. Stennis, Mississippi, Chairman 
January 15, 1951* 



Strom Thurmond, South Carolina 

January 11^, 1959* 
John G. Tower, Texas 

January 15, 1965* 
Barry Goldwater, Arizona 

January U, 1969* 
William L. Scott, Virginia 

January 12, 1973* 
Robert Taft, Jr., Ohio 

January 23, 197 i* 
Dewey F. Bartlett, Oklahoma 

January 23, 1975* 



Stuart Symington, Missouri 

January 13, 1953* 
Henry M. Jackson, Washington 

June 25, 195'f 
Howard W. Cannon, Xevada 

January 1!±, 1959* 
Thomas J. McIntyre, Xew 

Hampshire, August 10, 196^* 
Harry F. Byrd, Jr., Virginia 

January 11^, 1966* 
Sam Xunn, Georgia 

January 4, 1973* 
John C. Culver, Iowa 

January 17, 1975* 
Gary Hart, Colorado 

January 17, 1975* 
Patrick J. Leahy, Vermont 

January 17, 1975* 

The Senate Committees on Military Affairs; on the Militia: and 
Naval Affairs; tvere established on Dec. 10, 1816. The Committee on the 
Militia was merged with the Committee on Military Affairs in 1858 to 
form the Military Affairs a/nd Militia Committee. However, in 1872 
the committee dropped u ?nilitia" from its name. The Military Affairs 
and Naval Affairs Committees existed until 19Jp7 when they were com- 
bined by the Legislative Reorganization of 19^6 into a new standing 
committee, the current Armed Services Committee. 



•Date of appointment to Senate Armed Services Committee. 

(6) 



SUBCOMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS 

Democratic Members Republican Members 

Preparedness Investigating 

Senator Stennis (Chairman) 



Senator Symington 
Senator Jackson 
Senator Cannon 
Senator Mclntyre 
Senator Byrd 



Senator Symington 
Senator Camion 
Senator Mclntyre 



Senator Thurmond 
Senator Tower 
Senator Goldwater 
Senator Scott 
Senator Taft 

Intelligence 

Senator Stennis (Chairman) 

Senator Goldwater 
Senator Thurmond 



National Stockpile and Naval Petroleum Reserves 

Senator Cannon (Chairman) 



Senator Symington 
Senator Nunn 
Senator Hart 



Senator Scott 
Senator Taft 
Senator Bartlett 



Senator Jackson 
Senator Cannon 
Senator Byrd 
Senator Leahy 



Military Construction 

Senator Symington (Chairman) 

Senator Tower 
Senator Thurmond 
Senator Goldwater 

Arms Control 

Senator Jackson (Chairman) 



Senator Stennis 
Senator Symington 
Senator Mclntyre 
Senator Byrd 



Senator Tower 
Senator Taft 
Senator Bartlett 



(7) 



Democratic Members 



Senator Symington 
Senator Jackson 
Senator Nunn 
Senator Hart 



Senator Culver 
Senator Leahv 



Senator Mclntyre 
Senator Nunn 
Senator Leahv 



Senator Byrd 
Senator Culver 



Republican Members 
Tactical Air Power 

Senator Cannon (Chairman) 

Senator Goldwater 
Senator Tower 
Senator Thurmond 



Research and Development 

Senator Mclntyre (Chairman) 

Senator Taft 
Senator Goldwater 

General Legislation 

Senator Byrd (Chairman) 

Senator Bartlett 
Senator Tower 
Senator Scott 

Manpower and Personnel 

Senator Nunn (Chairman) 

Senator Scott 
Senator Bartlett 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS OF APPROPRIATIONS COMMITTEE TO CONSIDER 
DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS 



Senator Symington (Conferee) 
Senator Jackson 



Senator Thurmond 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS OF APPROPRIATIONS COMMITTEE TO CONSIDER 
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION APPROPRIATIONS 



Senator Symington (Conferee) 
Senator Cannon 



Senator Tower 



RELATIONSHIP OF ANNUAL AUTHORIZATION TO 
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS 

History of Section 138, Title 10, United States Code 

(Superseding "Section 412") 

The jurisdiction of the committee so far as specific annual authoriza- 
tions are concerned was increased significantly in 1959 by the enact- 
ment of section 412(b) of Public Law 86-149 which required annual 
congressional authorization of appropriations for the procurement of 
aircraft, missiles, and naval vessels. That law was amended and ex- 
panded as follows: 

In 1962 (Public Law 87-436) to require similar authorization of 
appropriations for research, development, test, or evaluation associ- 
ated with aircraft missiles, and naval vessels ; 

In 1963 (Public Law 88-174) to require authorization of appropri- 
ations for all research, development, test, or evaluation carried on by 
the Department of Defense; 

In 1965 (Public Law 89-37) to require authorization of appropria- 
tions for the procurement of tracked combat vehicles ; 

In 1967 (Public Law 90-168) to require annual authorization of 
the personnel strengths of each of the Selected Reserves of the Reserve 
components as a prior condition for the appropriation of funds for 
the pay and allowances for the Reserve components ; 

In 1969 (Public Law 91-121) to require authorization of appropria- 
tions for the procurement of other weapons to or for the use of any 
armed force of the United States. (Essentially, heavy, medium, and 
light artillery, antiaircraft artillery, rifles, machine-guns, mortars, 
small arms weapons, and any crew-fired piece using fixed ammuni- 
tion) ; 

In 1970 (Public Law 91-441) to require authorization of appropria- 
tions to or for the use of the Navy for the procurement of torpedoes 
and related support equipment; and to require authorization of the 
average annual active duty personnel strength for each component of 
the Armed Forces as a condition precedent to the appropriation of 
funds for this purpose; 

In 1972 (Public Law 92-436) to require annual authorization for the 
average military training student loads for each component of the 
Armed Forces, and modified the provisions relating to authorization 
for active duty personel strength; and 

In 1973 (Public Law 93-155) to require authorization for end 
strength civilian employment for each component of the Defense De- 
partment in each fiscal year. 

In 1975 (Public Law 94-106) to require the annual authorization of 
military construction of ammunition facilities. 

Also, in 1973 these enactments were codified by section 803(a) of 
Public Law 93-155 into title 10, United States Code, as section 138. 
The law today, therefore, reads as follows : 

(0) 



10 

§ 138. Secretary of Defense: Annual authorization of appropriations for armed 
forces 

( a ) No funds may be appropriated for any fiscal year to or for the 
use of any armed force or obligated or expended for — 

(1) procurement of aircraft, missiles, or naval vessels; 

(2) any research, development, test, or evaluation, or procure- 
ment or production related thereto ; 

(3 ) procurement of tracked combat vehicles ; 

(4) procurement of other weapons ; or 

(5 ) procurement of naval torpedoes and related support equip- 
ment ; 

unless funds therefor have been specifically authorized by law. 

(b) Congress shall authorize the personnel strength of the Selected 
Reserve of each reserve component of the armed forces. Xo funds may 
be appropriated for any fiscal year for the pay and allowances of mem- 
bers of any reserve component of the armed forces unless the personnel 
strength of the Selected Reserve of that reserve component for that 
fiscal year has been authorized by law. 

(c) (1) Congress shall authorize the end strength as of the end of 
each fiscal year for active-duty personnel for each component of the 
armed forces. Xo funds may be appropriated for any fiscal year to or 
for the use of the active-duty personnel of any component of the armed 
forces unless the end strength for active duty personnel of that com- 
ponent for that fiscal year has been authorized by law. 

(2) Congress shall authorize the end strength as of the end of each 
fiscal year for civilian personnel for each component of the Department 
of Defense. Xo funds may be appropriated for any fiscal year to or for 
the use of the civilian personnel of any component of the Department 
of Defense unless the end strength for civilian personnel of that com- 
ponent for the fiscal year has been authorized by law. 

(3) The Secretary of Defense shall submit to Congress a written 
report, not later than February 15 of each fiscal year, recommending 
the annual active duty end strength level for each component of the 
armed forces for the next fiscal year and the annual civilian personnel 
end strength level for each component of the Department of Defense 
for the next fiscal year, and shall include in that report justification 
for the strength levels recommended and as explanation of the rela- 
tionship between the personnel strength levels recommended for that 
fiscal year and the national security policies of the United States in 
effect at the time. The justification and explanation shall specify in 
detail for all military forces, including each land force division, carrier 
and other major combatant vessel, air wing, and other comparable 
unit, the — 

(A) unit mission and capability: 

(B) strategy which the unit supports: and 

(C) area of deployment and illustrative areas of potential de- 
ployment, including a description of any United States commit- 
ment to defend such areas. 

It shall also include a detailed discussion of (i) the manpower required 
for support and overhead functions within the armed forces and the 
Department of Defense, (ii) the relationship of the manpower required 
for support and overhead functions to the primary combat missions 
and support policies, and (iii) the manpower required to be stationed 
or assigned to duty in foreign countries and aboard vessels located 






11 

outside the territorial limits of the United States, its territories, and 
possessions. 

(d) (1) Congress shall authorize the average military training stu- 
dent loads for each component of the armed forces. Such authorization 
is not required for unit or crew training student loads, but is required 
for student loads for the following individual training categories — 

(A) recruit and specialized training; 

(B) flight training; 

(C) professional training in military and civilian institutions; 
and 

(D) officer acquisition training. 

No funds may be appropriated for any fiscal year for training military 
personnel in the training categories described in clauses (A)-(D) of 
any component of the armed forces unless the average student load of 
that component for that fiscal year has been authorized by law. 

(2) The Secretary of Defense shall submit to Congress a written 
report, not later than March 1 of each fiscal year, recommending the 
average student load for each category of training for each component 
of the armed forces for the next three fiscal years, and shall include 
in that report justification for, and explanation of, the average student 
loads recommended. 



LEGISLATION REPORTED BY THE COMMITTEE 

A total of 13 bills and resolutions were reported to the Senate by the 
committee during 1975. At the end of 1975 two of these bills became 
public law, one bill was vetoed, three bills and one resolution were 
pending in the House, one bill was in conference, two bills were pend- 
ing in the Senate, one bill and one resolution failed of passage in the 
Senate, and one resolution was passed in the Senate. A detailed sum- 
ma ry follows : 

Legislation Reported and Enacted Into Public Law 

To authorize appropriations during the fiscal year 1976, and the 
period of July 1, 1976, through September 30, 1976, for pro- 
curement of aircraft, missiles, naval vessels, tracked combat 
vehicles, torpedoes, and other weapons, and research, devel- 
opment, test, and evaluation for the Armed Forces, and to 
prescribe the authorized personnel strength for each active 
duty component and the Selected Reserve of each Reserve 
component of the Armed Forces and of civilian personnel of 
the Department of Defense, and to authorize the military 
training student loads, and for other purposes. 

(Public law 94-106, 94th Congress, H.R. 6674, October 7, 1975) 

TITLE I AXD TITLE VII (SEC. 701), PROCUREMENT 



Amounts requested and authorization enacted for the various major 
categories are shown in the following table. 



• lln millions of dollars] 




Fiscal year 1976 


Fiscal period 197T 


Request Authorized 


Request Authorized 



Aircraft 8,014.8 7,454.3 

Missiles 3,305.6 3,239.3 

Naval shipbuilding 5,446.0 3, 899.4 

Tracked combat vehicles... 1,016.5 965.5 

Naval torpedoes 197.4 189.5 

Otherweapons 100.7 92.1 

Procurement of defense articles 300.0 

Total 18,381.0 15,840.1 3,180.8 



1,746.6 

653.7 

474.2 

273.0 

19.2 

14.1 



1, 502. 9 

628.0 

474.2 

245.7 

19.2 

11.1 



2, 881. 1 



(12) 



13 

TITLE H AND TITLE VII (SECTION 702 ) , RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND 

EVALUATION 

The amounts requested and authorized are as follows : 

[in millions of dollars] 

Fiscal year 1976 Fiscal period 197T 



Request Authorized Request Authorized 



Army 2,181.7 2,028.9 585.6 513.3 

Navy... 3,470.2 3,318.6 903.8 849.7 

Air Force 3,903.2 3,737.0 1,034.0 965.8 

Defense agencies 625.3 588.7 159.5 144.8 



Total 10,181.4 9,673.3 2,682.9 2,473.6 



TITLE III AND TITLE VII (SECTION 703), ACTIVE FORCES 

End strengths requested and authorization enacted for active duty 
personnel of each component of the Armed Forces are as follows : 

Fiscal year 1976 Fiscal period 197T 



Request Authorization Request Authorization 



Army 785,000 785,000 793,000 793,000 

Navy 528,700 528,700 535,900 535,900 

Marine Corps 196,300 196,300 196,500 196,500 

Air Force 590,000 590,000 590,000 590,000 



Total 2,100,000 2,100,000 2,115,400 2,115,400 

This authorization by components was followed by a requirement 
for a reduction of 9,000 active duty military personnel for fiscal year 
1976 and fiscal year 197T, to be appropriated by the Secretary of 
Defense. 

TITLE IV AND TITLE VII (SECTION 704), RESERVE FORCES 

The requested and enacted average strengths of the Selected Reserve 
of each reserve component of the Armed Forces are shown in the 
following table. 



Army National Guard 

Army Reserve.. 

Naval Reserve 

Marine Corps Reserve 

Air National Guard 

Air Force Reserve. 

Coast Guard Reserve 

Total 897,300 915,900 897,200 917,800 



Fiscal year 


1976 




Fiscal per 


iod 197T 


Request 


Authorization 


Request 


Authorization 


400, 000 




400, 000 


400, 000 


400, 000 


212,400 




219, 000 


212, 400 


219,000 


94, 000 




106, 000 


92, 000 


106, 000 


32, 500 




32, 500 


33, 000 


33, 000 


94, 900 




94, 900 


94, 500 


94, 500 


51, 800 




51,800 


53, 600 


53, 600 


11,700 




11, 700 


11, 700 


11, 700 



69-839—76 3 



14 



334, 100 


337, 800 


322, 100 


322,900 


255, 900 


257, 800 


72. 900 


72. 900 



TITLE V AND TITLE VII (SECTION 7 05). CIVILIAN PERSONNEL 

The following table summarizes the requested direct hire civilian 
personnel end strengths: 

Fiscal year Fiscal period 
1976 197T 

Army . 

Navy Marine Corps - — 

Air Force 

Defense agencies — 

Total... 985,000 985,000 

The Congress authorized a total direct and indirect hire civilian 
personnel end strength of 1,058,000 for fiscal year 1976 and 1,064,400 

for fiscal year 197T. This included a reduction of 28.000 from each 
overall request, to be allocated by the Secretary of Defense. 

TITLE VI AND TITLE VII ( SECTION 706), MILITARY TRAINING STUDENT LOADS 

The average military training student load as requested and as 
enacted are shown in the following table : 



Army 

Navy 

Marine Corps 

Air Force 

Army National Guard 

Army Reserve 

Naval Reserve 

Marine Corps Reserve 

Air National Guard 

Air Force Reserve 

Total 254,700 254,700 249,100 249,100 

TITLE VIII GENERAL PROVISIONS 

Section 801. — This section expands the congressional authorization 
of military construction to include certain military construction not 
associated with R.D.T. & E. or production of weapons systems. 

Section 802. — This section changes from four months to twelve 
weeks the statutory time period required for training before an active 
duty seiviceman can be assigned overseas. It also changes from four 
months to twelve weeks the period of initial active duty for training 
for leservists. 

Section 803. — This section provides for the admission of women 
to the military service academies beginning in calendar year 1976. 

Section 804. — This section authorizes the Secretary of Defense and 
the Secretary of a military department to provide such funds as would 
be necessary for emergency and extraordinary expenses. 

Section 805. — This section changes from 66 days in advance to 
90 days in advance the time limit for the supplemental reports to 
Congress on the award of contracts or the exercise of options in the 
contract. 

Section 806. — This section amends title 10, United States Code to 
prevent military personnel who retire from receiving less retirement 



Fiscal year 


1976 


Fiscal period 


197T 


Request 


Authorization 


Request 


Authorization 


83, 100 


83, 100 


75, 200 


75, 200 


69, 500 


69, 500 


70, 600 


70, 600 


26, 500 


26, 500 


26, 800 


26, 800 


51,200 


51,200 


52, 300 


52, 300 


9,800 


9,800 


9,500 


9,500 


7, 400 


7,400 


5,500 


5,500 


1, 700 


1,700 


2,100 


2,100 


2, 800 


2,800 


4,100 


4,100 


1,900 


1,900 


2,200 


2,200 


800 


800 


800 


800 



15 

pay than if they had retired at an earlier date but after January 1, 
1971. 

Section 807. — This section authorizes the Secretary of the Xavy 
to conclude claim settlements on ship programs under contract prior 
to July 1, 1974, contingent upon future authorizations and appro- 
priations for that purpose. 

Section 808. — This section directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a 5-year naval ship new construction and conversion program 
each fiscal year. 

Section 809.— This section provides that the restrictive language 
in section 101 of Public Law 93-365 relating to the use of funds for 
the DLGN nuclear guided missile frigate program shall not apply 
with respect to $101 million of long lead funding for the DLGX-42 
nuclear guided missile frigate. 

Section 810. — This section prohibits multi-year contracts with can- 
cellation ceilings that exceed $5 million unless first approved by 
Congress. 

Section 811. — -This section requires that selected acquisition reports 
be submitted within 30 days after the end of each quarter of each 
fiscal year and that all information from congressional data sheets be 
included. 

Section 812. — This section requires that the Secretary of Defense, 
after consultation with the Secretary of State, submit an annual 
report to the Congressional Committees on Armed Service- relating 
U.S. military force structure and foreign policy. 

Section 813. — This section requires that for any foreign military 
sale or transfer of $25 million or more the Secretary of Defense 
submit a report to the Congress on the impact of such sales or transfers 
on the current readiness of U.S. forces and the adequacy of reim- 
bursements to cover the full replacement costs for such item<. 

Section 814-. — This section states the sense of Congress that equip- 
ment procured for U.S. forces stationed in Europe be interoperable 
with that of other members of NATO to the maximum extent feasible, 
and requires a report on the initiation of procurement action on such 
equipment when it is not in compliance with this policy. 

Section 815. — This section extends until June 30, 1977, the authority 
to transfer by sale, credit sale, or guaranty aircraft and military 
equipment the President deems necessary to maintain the military 
balance in the Middle East. 

Section 816. — This section prohibits discrimination by U.S. citizens, 
or by corporations with the United States in the supply of petroleum 
products for the use of U.S. Armed Forces. 

Section 817. — This section requires the Secretary of Defense to 

provide the Congressional Committees on Armed Services a plan that 

identifies the platform and funding for AEGIS fleet implementation. 

Section 818. — This section prohibits the production of lethal binary 

chemical munitions unless the President certifies to Congre>< that 

the production of such munitions is essential to the national interest. 

Section 819. — This section provides for a 5 percent "cap" on 

increases in military active-duty pay through fiscal year 1976 subject 

to a similar cap being placed on civil service classified pay increases. 

Section 820. — This section provides that the number of enlisted 

aides on the personal staffs of certain military officers be established 

through a certain formula and allocated by the Secretary of Defense. 



SENATE COMMITTEE PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS 

Growing Trends of Soviet Military Efforts 

The committee firmly believes that the amounts being- recommended 
for fiscal year 1976 are sufficient for this fiscal year to meet United 
States defense needs. Prior to United States involvement in Vietnam 
the United States enjoyed a relative military advantage both in strate- 
gic and conventional arms over the Soviet Union. Since that time 
the Soviet military strength has been gradually increasing to a point 
which, if continued in the years ahead, could result in a shift of the 
military balance against the United States. This fact must be recog- 
nized in making a judgment on U.S. defense needs. The following 
example illustrate this trend : 

1. From 10 years ago the Soviet Union has increased its mili- 
tary manpower by about 750,000 to almost 4 million. The U.S., 
on the other hand, has reduced its military manpower by 585,000 
to about 2.1 million men. 

2. The U.S.S.R. within the last 10 years has maintained about 
the same number of major combatant ships and submarines. The 
U.S. compared to 10 years ago has reduced this category of ships 
by about one-third. 

3. The Soviet Union has maintained a level number of tactical 
aircraft over the last year period which the U.S. has reduced their 
number by seventeen percent. 

4. While the U.S. maintains a technological superiority with 
regard to research and development in certain areas, the Soviet 
Union is closing the gap. 

(16) 



PERCENTAGE REDUCTIONS 

Percentage Funds Reduction Overall — 16.2 Percent From the 
Fiscal Year 1976 Request and 10.1 Percent From the Transition 
Period Request 

The Committee recommended authorization of appropriations of 
$25,012,535,000 for fiscal year 1976 and $5,271,798,000 for the transi- 
tion period of July 1, 1976, through September 30, 1976. The fiscal 
year 1976 net reduction of $4,842,853,000 from the request of $29,855,- 
388,000 represents a 16.2 percent reduction. A reduction of $591,939,- 
000 million, or 10.1 percent, was recommended from the transition 
period request of $5,863,737,000. 

12.6 Percent Omitting South Vietnam Request 

When the request and deletion of funds for Military Support of 
South Vietnam were excluded, the reduction represented 12.6 percent 
of the request for Procurement and Research, Development, Test and 
Evaluation. 

94 Percent Omitting South Vietnam Request and Navy Ship 
Cost Growth 

Excluding both Military Support of Vietnam and the $902.3 million 
recommended for reduction from Navy Shipbuilding cost growth and 
escalation because those shipbuilding funds were not required for 
obligation in fiscal year 1976, the remaining program reduction would 
have been 9.4 percent. 

Percentage Manpower Reductions Overall — 1 Percent Active 
Duty Military and 2 Percent Civilian From Request 

The Committee recommended authorization of an active duty mili- 
tary end strength of 2,081,700, a net reduction of 18,300 or about 1 
percent, from the request of 2,100,000. The Committee recommended 
authorization of a civilian end strength of 962,000, a net reduction of 
23,000, or about 2 percent, from the request of 985,000. 

(17) 



MAJOR CHANGES BY SENATE COMMITTEE TO FISCAL 
YEAR 1976 AND FISCAL YEAR 197T REQUESTS 

The Senate report discusses in detail all of the various changes 
recommended by the committee on all aspects of the bill. The follow- 
ing is a list of the more significant changes recommended by the 
committee. 

Major Funding Changes — From Request 

Denial of funding requested to support Foreign Military Sales 
program 
Funds in the amount of S300 million for fiscal year 1976 to provide 
support of Foreign Military Sales programs have been denied. 

Deletion of funds for Army UH-1H helicopters 

Denial of $24.8 million requested for procurement of 48 UH-1H 
helicopters. 

Change in funding requested for Marine Corps A-4M aircraft 

Reduction of 24 aircraft and $61.8 million in fiscal year 1976 and 
approval of $8.2 million for improvement items. (Conference added 
3 aircraft and 89. S million in fiscal year 197T.) 

Revision of A-6E program funding 

Reduction of 4 A-6E aircraft in fiscal year 1976 and addition of 3 
A-6E aircraft plus advance procurement for fiscal year 1977 in the 
transition period. ( Conference restored 3 aircraft in fiscal year 1976 
and deleted 3 aircraft in fiscal year 197T.) 

Reduction of funds in transition period for Navy F-14 aircraft 

Reduction of 9 aircraft and $73.3 million and addition of $33.3 mil- 
lion for advance procurement in the transition period. (Conference 
restored 9 aircraft and $73.3 million and deducted $33.3 million for 
advanr-e procurement in transition period. 

Denial of procurement funding for Air Force B-l bomber 

Denial of $77 million in fiscal year 1976 and $31 million in the 
transition period for advance procurement for the B-l bomber. (Con- 
ference restored $64.0 million in fiscal year 1976 and $23.0 million in 
the transition period.) 

Reduction of funds for Air Force F-15 fighter aircraft 

Reduction of $22.3 million for engineering change orders and $147.7 
million for spares and repair parts for the F-15 aircraft and $3.7 
million for spares and repair parts in the transition period. (Confer- 
ence restored $147.3 million for F-15 spares and repair parts in fiscal 
year 1976 and $3.7 million in fiscal year 197T.) 

(18) 



19 

Denial of procurement funds requested in the transition period 
for the Air Force Advanced Airborne Command Post aircraft 

Denial of $185.8 million requested for 3 Advanced Airborne Com- 
mand Post aircraft including initial spares. No change to R&D request. 

Denial of Civil Reserve Airlift Fleet modifications 

Denial of $22 million in fiscal year 1976 and $24 million in the 
transition period proposed for modification of civilian aircraft for 
cargo capability. 

Denial of funds for War Reserve Material for Allies 

Denial of $22.7 million for procurement of AIM-9H Sidewinder 
missiles, $1.3 million for procurement of recovery vehicles, $1.6 mil- 
lion for F-5 war consumables, and $13.9 million for TOW missiles for 
stockpiles for allies. ($13.9 million for TOW missiles and $1.3 million 
for procurement of recovery vehicles were restored with the provision 
that these items could be purchased only for U.S. inventories.) 

Denial of funds for Navy Nuclear Frigate 

Denial of $257 million for full funding of one Nuclear Frigate and 
recoupment of $75 million in funds previously approved for advance 
procurement. 

Deletion of funds for Navy Patrol Hydrofoil Missile ship 

Deletion of $83.4 million for 2 Patrol Hydrofoil Missile ships and 
$85 million for cost growth and escalation on prior year ships. (Con- 
ference restored $83.4 million for 2 PHM ships.) 

Reduction of funds requested for cost growth and escalation for 
prior year shipbuilding programs 

Reduction of $902.3 million requested for cost growth and escalation 
for fiscal year 1975 and prior Navy ship programs. (Conference re- 
stored $4.6 million.) 

Reduction of funds for Navy Patrol Frigate program 

Reduction of $270 million and 3 of the 10 Patrol Frigates requested. 
(Conference restored 2 Patrol Frigates and $185.0 million.) 

Denial of production funds for the Vulcan-Phalanx Close-in 
Weapon System 

Denial of $115.5 million in procurement funding related to the 
Vulcan-Phalanx Close-in Weapon System. 

Reduction of M60 tank and modification funds 

Reduction of $51.0 million in fiscal year 1976 and $27.3 million in 
the transition period for proposed modifications to the M60 tank. 



RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 

Reduction in R&D funds and deletion of Initial Production funds 
for Air Force B-l Development 

Reduction of $114.3 million from $840.5 million requested for R&D 
and all of $108 million requested for Procurement in fiscal year 1976 
and 197T limiting the program to initiation of a fourth prototype but 
deferring initial production funding until fiscal year 1977. 

Reduction in Army Site Defense program 

Reduction of $70 million from the $140 million requested for fiscal 
year 1976 and $19 million of the $38 million requested for 197T for 
this Ballistic Missile Defense program to a sustaining technology pro- 
gram as a hedge against ABM Treaty abrogation. ($30 million in fiscal 
year 1976 and $6 million in 197T was restored in conference.) 

Reduction in Navy Trident Missile program 

Deletion of $4 million requested in fiscal year 1976 and 197T for 
Trident II missile because initiation of development is premature. 

Reduction of R&D funds for Army Heavy Lift Helicopter 

Reduction of $13.8 million in fiscal year 1976 and 197T due to 
termination of Heavy Lift Helicopter program which no longer is 
required. 

Denial of R&D funds for Army Aerial Scout Helicopter 

Reduction of $18.6 million in fiscal year 1976 and 197T because 
Army has not yet determined and approved the specific character- 
istics of the Aerial Scout helicopter and whether a new or existing 
helicopter will be selected. ($11.1 million ($4.3 milion in fiscal year 
1976 and $6.8 million in 197T) was restored in conference.) 

Reduction of R&D funds for Air Force Air Combat Fighter 

Reduction of $51.9 million from fiscal year 1976 request for $273 
million and $12.8 million from 19 7T request for $82.5 million as 
being in excess of funds needed for development during these periods. 

Reduction of R&D funds for Navy LAMPS ASW Helicopter 

Reduction of $9.3 million from the fiscal year 1976 request for $35.4 
million and $1.9 million from the 197T request for $3.9 million to 
deny funding for the two Army UTTAS contractors planned by the 
Navy to be used for the ASW helicopter. This should be an industry- 
wide competition. 

Major Manpower Changes — From Request 

Active Duty Military: 

Reduction of Army Active Duty Military Strength 

Reduction of 5,700 from the Army requested fiscal year 1976 end 
strength of 785,000, all to be taken from non-combat units. Included 

(20) 



21 

are reductions in base operating support, training staffs and overhead 
and support related to U.S. forces based in Thailand. 

Reduction of Navy Active Duty Military Strength 

Reduction of 4,600 from the Navy requested fiscal year 1976 end 
strength of 528,700, all to be taken from non-combat units. Included 
are reductions in command/headquarters personnel, base operating 
support, training staff's and overhead and support related to U.S. 
forces based in Thailand. 

Reduction of Marine Corps Active Duty Military Strength 

Reduction of 400 from the Marine Corps requested fiscal year 1976 
end strength of 196,300, all to be taken from non-combat units. 
Included are reductions in command/headquarters personnel. 

Reduction of Air Force Active Duty Military Strength 

Reduction of 7,600 from the Air Force requested fiscal year 1976 
end strength of 590,000, all to be taken from non-combat units. 
Included are reductions in command/headquarters personnel, base 
operating support, training staffs and overhead and support related 
to U.S. forces based in Thailand. 

(9,300 of the overall 18,300 reduction was restored in conference. 
The remaining 9,000 reduction was to be allocated among the services 
by the Secretary of Defense.) 

Civilian Personnel: 

Reduction of Army Civilian Strength 

A reduction of 5,100 from the Army requested fiscal year 1976 end 
strength of 334,100. Included are reductions in base operating support, 
training staffs and overhead, and support related to U.S. forces based 
in Thailand. 

Reduction of Navy-Marine Corps Civilian Strength 

A reduction of 11,800 from the Navy-Marine Corps requested fiscal 
year 1976 end strength of 322,100. Included are reductions in com- 
mand/headquarters personnel, base operating support, training staffs 
and overhead and support related to U.S. forces based in Thailand. 

Reduction of Air Force Civilian Strength 

Reduction of 4,600 from the Air Force requested fiscal year 1976 end 
strength of 255,900. Included are reductionns in command/head- 
quarters personnel, base operating support, training staffs and over- 
head and support related to U.S. forces based in Thailand. 

Reduction of Defense Agencies Civilian Strength 

Reduction of 1,500 from the Defense Agencies requested fiscal year 
1976 end strength of 72,900. Included are reductions in command/ 
headquarters personnel and base operating support. 

(Conference changed the reduction to allow the Secretary of Defense 
to allocate the total reduction of 23,000 civilian personnel among the 
services.) 

Change in Method of Authorizing Selected Reserve Strengths 

The committee accepted the Defense Department's request for 
Selected Reserve component strengths. In addition, the committee 
recommended that the strengths be authorized as end strengths and 



22 

continue to be programmed to achieve a minimum average strength 
of not less than one-half the sum of the strength at the beginning and 
the strength at the end of the fiscal year. (Conference authorized aver- 
age Selected Reserve strength.) 

Denial of $1.3 Billion for Support of South Vietnam Military 

Forces 

Beginning in fiscal year 1966 the defense budget has provided for 
funding in support of South Vietnamese military forces. Because of 
the recent collapse of the government of South Vietnam, $1.3 billion 
in military support to South Vietnam has been denied. 



LANGUAGE CHANGES 

Funding authority for support of South Vietnamese military 
forces. — The President's fiscal year 1976 budget requested as a sep- 
arate general provision $1,293 billion in obligational authority for 
support of South Vietnamese military forces. In light of the collapse 
of the Government of South Vietnam, the committee denied the entire 
amount. 

Stockpiling of defense articles for foreign countries. — The Pres- 
ident's budget request included a general provision which would have 
repealed Section 514 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended. 
Section 514 prohibits the obligation of funds "for the purpose of 
stockpiling any defense article or war reserve material" for foreign 
countries unless such funds are made available pursuant to the Foreign 
Assistance Act or other corresponding legislation. The committee 
decided not to repeal Section 514 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, 
as amended and thereby refused to authorize the funding of military 
stockpiles for foreign countries out of the Defense budget. 

The Committee added the following statutory provisions to the bill : 

Readiness report. — The Committee added language requiring the 
Secretary of Defense to submit to Congress an annual detailed report 
on the readiness of the Armed Forces to perform their assigned mis- 
sions. The report would include an assessment of the material and 
equipment readiness of the forces, improvements expected within the 
budget authority requested for the current and upcoming fiscal year 
and the criteria used to assess readiness. (Conference deleted this 
language.) 

Foreign military sales report. — The Committee included language 
requiring the Secretary of Defense to report to the Congress on the 
impact of any sales or transfers of defense articles from active inven- 
tories in the amount of $25,000,000 or more. The report would assess 
the impact of such actions on U.S. force readiness and the adequacy 
of reimbursements to cover the replacement costs of such items. (Con- 
ference agreed to compromise language. ) 

Chemical warfare — binary munitions. — The Committee included 
language to prohibit the research, development, testing and evaluation 
of offensive binary other lethal chemical munitions. Xo funds would 
be used for the production or ^reproduction of such defensive muni- 
tions unless the President certifies in advance that it is essential to the 
national interest. (Conference agreed to compromise language.) 

NATO standardization. — The Committee included language de- 
claring it to be the policy of the United States that equipment procured 
for U.S. forces stationed in Europe under NATO be "standardized and 
interoperable with" equipment of NATO allies. The language provides 
for the exclusion of such equipment from the so-called "Buy American 
Act." (Conference agreed to compromise language.) 

Life cycle costs. — The Committee included language requiring 
measures of the costs of acquiring, operating, and maintaining major 

1 23 



24 

weapon systems over their useful life. The language required a com- 
parison of the costs and manpower requirements of new major systems 
with current weapons systems which perform similar missions. (Con- 
ference deleted this language.) 

Suggestions from retirees on procurement policy improve- 
ments. — The Committee included language directing the Secretary 
of Defense to request suggestions from retiring military officers and 
civilian personnel above grade of GS-13 on methods to improve pro- 
curement policies. Quarterly reports on such suggestions would be 
furnished to the House and Senate Armed Services Committees. (Con- 
ference deleted this language.) 

Permanent authority for emergency and extraordinary ex- 
penses. — The Committee included language authorizing the Secretary 
of Defense and Service Secretaries to "provide for any emergency or 
extraordinary expenses which cannot be anticipated or classified" 
within the limits of specific appropriations for "emergency or extraor- 
dinary expenses". (Conference added requirement to report such ex- 
penditures to certain Congressional Committees.) 

Modification of congressional supplemental report on contract 
awards. — The Committee included language extending the reporting 
period on contract awards to not more than ninety days before the 
award of any contract on major weapons systems. The current require- 
ment was for notification not more than sixty days before such award. 

SUMMARY OF AMENDMENTS TO FISCAL YEAR 1976 AND FISCAL YEAR 197T DEFENSE PROCUREMENT AUTHOR- 
IZATION BILL ACTED UPON DURING SENATE FLOOR AND CONFERENCE ACTION 



Amendment No. 
and Senator 



Subject 



Vote 



Conference 
action 



282— Schweiker 

480— Javits 

488— Hathaway. 

489— Hartke.... 

490— Abourezk. 
491— Jackson... 

492— Jackson... 
494— Mclntyre.. 

496— Kennedy.. 
500— Proxmire . 

502— Taft 

503— Taft 

506— Symington 

507— Dole 

501— Proxmire.. 

511— Bellmon.. 
513— Buckley... 

514— Proxmire.. 

515— Proxmire.. 

516 — Proxmire.. 
517 — Humphrey. 
518— Culver 



Recruitment 

Manpov/er utilization and costs. 
Females to military academies. . 

Elimination of industrially fund- 
ed civilians from DOD civilian 
manpower ceilings. 

Feed and forage 

DOD discrimination in petrol- 
eum procurement. 

Aircraft sales to Israel 

R.D.T. & E. funds for counter- 
force programs. 

Minuteman III... 

Enlisted aides 



Withdrawn June 5, 1975 

do 

Passed voice vote, modified Adopted modi 

form, June 6, 1975. form. 

Defeated 40 to 50, June 6, 1975. 



Passed voice vote, June 5, 1975. Rejected. 
Passed 83 to 8, modified form, Adopted modified 

June 6, 1975. form. 

Passed 68 to 22, June 6, 1975... Adopted. 
Defeated 42 to 52, June 4, 1975. 



form 



Defeated 27 to 56, June 5, 1975. 

Passed voice vote, modified Adopted modified 

form June 5, 1975. 

Advanced hydrofoil craft. Defeated voice vote, June 5, 

1975. 
ship development Defeated 31 to 64, June 5, 1975. 



Advanced 

program. 
$23,800,000,000 fiscal year 1976 

ceiling and $5,000,000,000 

fiscal year 197T ceiling. 
Naval Reserve end strength to 

112,000. 
Former DOD employees or 

officers employed in private 

business. 

B-l funds restoration 

R. & D. funds increase 



Defeated 36 to 59, June 4, 1975. 



Defeated voice vote, June 5, 

1975. 
Withdrawn June 5, 1975 



do. 



DD-963 destroyer funds reduc- 
tion. 
F-18 

Civilian personnel reduction 

MaRV 

Foreign policy and military force 
structure annual report. 



Defeated voice vote, June 5, 

1975. 
Withdrawn June 6, 1975 



Passed voice vote, modified Rejected, 
form, June 6, 1975. 

Passed 42-40, June 4, 1975 Rejected. 

Passed 43-41, June 6, 1975 Rejected. 

Passed voice vote, June 6, 1975.. Adopted-Modified 
form. 



25 

SUMMARY OF AMENDMENTS TO FISCAL YEAR 1976 AND FISCAL YEAR 197T DEFENSE PROCUREMENT AUTHOR- 
IZATION BILL ACTED UPON DURING SENATE FLOOR AND CONFERENCE ACTION— Continued 

Amendment No. Conference 

and Senator Subject Vote action 

521— Hathaway Submarine cruise launch missile Defeated 16-72, June 4, 1975.. 

funds deletion. 

527— Eagleton. AWACS Defeated 38-58, June 5, 1975... 

528— Stevens. Law school eligibility for former Passed voice vote, June 5, 1975.. Adopted. 

POWs. 

529— Weicker F-16 and F 18 Withdrawn June 6, 1975 

530— Glenn Expenditure reporting Passed voice vote, June 5, 1975.. Adopted-Modified 

form. 
531— Domenici Civilian and military manpower Withdrawn, June 5, 1975 

ceilings study. 
532— Kennedy.. Student-instructor ratio in mili- Passed voice vote, modified Rejected. 

tary training. form, June 6, 1975. 

533— McGovern B-l (substitute for McGovern Defeated 32-57, June 5, 1975... 

Amendment 220). 

534— Tower Retired pay inversion Passed 49-39, modified form, Adopted. 

June 6, 1975. 

535— Gravel Limitation to 14 Army divisions. Defeated 2-70, June 4, 1975 

536— Gravel. Tactical nuclear weapons Defeated voice vote, June 6, 

1975. 

539— Gravel Active duty personnel reduction. Defeated voice vote, June 5, 

1975. 
540— Gravel Site defense Defeated 39-54, June 5, 1975... 



Legislative History 

House Reports No. 94-199 (Committee on Armed Services), 94-413 (1st Confer- 
ence Committee), 94-488 (2nd Conference Committee) 
Senate Reports No. 94-146 (S. 920 with an amendment in the nature of a sub- 
stitute, Committee on Armed Services), 94-334 (1st Conference Committee), 
94-385 (2nd Conference Committee) 
Congressional Record, Vol. 121 (1975) : 

May 15, 19, 20, considered and passed House. 

May 22, June 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, S. 920, as amended, put in H.R. 6674 ; considered and 

passed Senate. 
July 30, House agreed to 1st conference report. 
Aug. 1, Senate did not agree to 1st conference report. 
Sept. 24, House agreed to 2nd conference report. 
Sept. 26, Senate agreed to 2nd conference report. 



To authorize certain construction at military installations, and 

for other purposes 

(Public Law 94-107, 94th Congress, S. 1247, October 7, 1975) 

The total authorization granted for new military construction for 
fiscal year 1976 and the three month transition period was 

$3,853,705,000. 



26 

A summary of the total authority granted is as follows : 

Total authorization for appropriation granted fiscal year 1976 and the 

transition period 

[In thousands of dollars] 
Title I— Army : 

Inside the United States $596. 515 

Outside the United States 172, 525 



Subtotal 769, 040 

Title II— Navy : 

Inside the United States 684, 339 

Outside the United States 21. 170 

Subtotal 705. 509 

Title III— Air Force : 

Inside the United States 379.041 

Outside the United States 102, 846 

Section 302 3. 982 

Subtotal 485. 869 

Title IV — Defense agencies 44, 800 

Title V— Military family housing 1, 642, 883 

Total, titles I, II, III, IV, and V 3. 648. 101 

Title VII — Reserve components : 

Army National Guard 54. 7 J 5 

Army Reserve 44, 459 

Navy and Marine Corps Reserve 34. 800 

Air National Guard ■ 55. 100 

Air Force Reserve 16. 500 

Total 205, 604 

Grand total granted by titles I, II, III, IV, V, and VII 3, S53. 705 

Continuing the trend established in recent military construction 
programs, substantial portions of this years authority are committed 
to bachelor and family housing, medical facilities, and pollution abate- 
ment projects. A new six year program aimed at reducing energy con- 
sumption was initiated with approximately $135,000,000 authorized in 
this bill for projects that will significantly reduce energy consumption 
and thereby amortize the investment cost in less than four year. 

The island of Diego Garcia continued as an item of major contro- 
versv in this bill. The fiscal year 1975 construction bill had included 
conditional authorization for expanded facilities at Diego Garcia 
subject to Presidential certification as to need and provided that 
neither the Senate nor the House of Representatives adopted a resolu- 
tion of disapproval. During consideration of the fiscal year 1976 bill, 
which contains an additional Si 3.800.000 increment for Diego Garcia, 
the required Presidential certification was presented to Congre.-s and 
the issue debated in the Senate where, by a vote of 53-43. a resolution 
of disapproval was defeated. 

The Department of Defense requested $175,000,000 to build hardened 
shelters for aircraft stationed in. or scheduled for early deployment to. 
the XATO countries. "While the wisdom of providing protection for 



27 

aircraft committed to NATO missions is unquestioned, the issue- of 
who should provide the funds and whether or not to build shelters 
for contingency aircraft that were not stationed in Europe sparked 
considerable debate. The authority approved was for $52,738,000 which 
is the amount that can be recouped from NATO funds at some later 
date. 

The Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, Bethesda, 
Maryland, received an initial $15,000,000 funding increment in the 
fiscal year 1975 construction bill. The fiscal year t9?6 bill contains 
$64,900,000 in additional authority which will permit the major facili- 
ties to be constructed and the first class is expected to be graduated in 
1980. The Committees very carefully reviewed the cost effectiveness of 
this project before recommending authorization of this year's Large 
increment that will insure construction of the medical university. 

$86,000,000 was requested by the Department of Defense to build a 
new headquarters for the Defense Intelligence Agency at Boiling Air 
Force Base near Washington, D.C. The authority was denied because 
the authorizing Committees were not satisfied that providing a perma- 
nent facility for the Defense Intelligence Agency was appropriate in 
view of the extensive review of the entire Federal Intelligence Com- 
munity that was underway in both Houses of Congress and within 
the Executive Branch itself. 

Legislative History 

House Reports: No. 94-293 accompanying H.R. 5210 (Comin. on Armed Services) 

and No. 94-483 (Comm. of Conference). 
Senate Reports : Xo. 94-157 (Comm. on Armed Services) and Xo. 94-376 (Comm. 

of Conference). 
Congressional Record, Vol. 121 (1975) : 
June 9. considered and passed Senate. 

July 28, considered and passed House, amended, in lieu of H.R. 5210. 
September 24, House agreed to conference report. 
September 29, Senate agreed to conference report. 



Legislation Reported By The Committee But Not Enacted Into 

Public Law 

To authorize the appointment of Alexander P. Butterfield to the 
retired list of the Regular Air Force, and for other purposes. 
(S. 182) 

Legislative History 

Senate Report No. 94-110 (Committee on Armed Services) . 
Congressional Record, Vol. 121 (1975) : 

May 20, considered and defeated in Senate. 



To extend, pending international agreement, the fisheries man- 
agement responsibility and authority of the United States over 
the fish in certain areas in order to conserve and protect such 
fish from depletion, and for other purposes. (S. 961) 

Legislative History 

Senate Reports No. 94-416 (Committee on Commerce), 94-459 (Adverse report, 
Committee on Foreign Relations), and 94-515 (Committee on Armed Services). 
Congressional Record, Vol. 121 (1975) : 
Dec. 19, considered in Senate. 



To make the provisions of section 1331(e) of title 10, United States 
Code, retroactive to November 1, 1953. (S. 2090) 

Legislative History 

Senate Report No. 94-560 (Committee on Armed Services) . 
Congressional Record, Vol. 121 (1975) : 

Dec. 17, considered and passed Senate. 

Dec. 18, referred to House Committee on Armed Services. 



To amend title 37, United States Code, relating to special pay 
for nuclear qualified officers, and for other purposes. (S. 2114) 

Legislative History 

House Report No. 94-644 (Committee on Armed Services). 
Senate Report No. 94-329 (Committee on Armed Services). 
Congressional Record, Vol. 121 (1975) : 

July 26, considered and passed, amended, Senate. 

Nov. 17, considered and passed, amended, House. 

Nov. 20, Senate disagreed to House amendment. 



To amend chapter 39 of title 10, United States Code, to enable 
the President to authorize the involuntary order to active duty 
of Selected Reservists, for a limited period, whether or not a 

(28) 



29 

declaration of war or national emergency has been declared. 
(S. 2115) 

Legislative History 

Senate Report Xo. 94-562 (Committee on Armed Services). 
Congressional Record, Vol. 121 (1975) : 

Dec. 15, reported to Senate with amendment. 



To amend sections 5202 and 5232 of title 10, United States Code, 
relating to the appointment to the grades of general and lieu- 
tenant general of Marine Corps officers designated for appro- 
priate higher commands or for performance of duties of great 
importance and responsibility. (S. 2117) 

Legislative Histoey 

Senate Report No. 94-561 (Committee on Armed Services) . 
Congressional Record, Vol. 121 (1975) : 

Dec. 17, considered and passed Senate, amended to include language of H.R, 
9691. 

Dec. IS, referred to House Committee on Armed Services. 



To fully explore and develop the naval petroleum reserves of 
the United States and to permit limited production with reve- 
nues derived therefrom to be placed in a special account, and 
for other purposes. (S. 2173) 

Legislative History 

House Reports Xo. 94-81 (Part II, Committee on Armed Services) and 94-98 

(Part III, Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs). 
Senate Report Xo. 94-327 (Committee on Armed Services). 
Congressional Record, Vol. 121 (1975) : 

July 28, 29, considered and passed Senate with provisions inserted in H.R. 49. 

July 8, H.R. 49 considered and passed, amended, House. 

Sept. 17, conference scheduled in House. 

Oct. 2, conference scheduled in Senate. 

Dec. 2, 4, 8, 10, 15, 16, conferees met. 

******* 

To amend the National Security Act of 1947, as amended, to in- 
clude the Secretary of the Treasury as a member of the Na- 
tional Security Council. (S. 2350) 

Legislative History 

House Report Xo. 94-730 (Committee on Armed Services). 
Senate Report Xo. 94-423 (Committee on Armed Services). 
Congressional Record, Vol. 121 (1975) : 

Oct. 9, considered and passed Senate. 

Dec. 17, considered and passed House. 

Dec. 31, vetoed by President. 



Resolutions Reported 

Relating to the establishment of the naval and maritime museum 
in Charleston, South Carolina. (S. Con. Res. 9) 

Legislative History 

Senate Report Xo. 94-18 (Committee on Armed Services) . 
Congressional Record, Vol. 121 (1975) : 

Feb. 28, considered and passed Senate. 

Mar. 4, referred to House Committee on Armed Services. 

******* 

Authorizing additional expenditures by the Committee on Armed 
Services for Inquiries and Investigations. (S. Res. 87) 

Legislative History 

Feb. 24, resolution reported without written report. 
Senate Report No. 94-305 (Committee on Rules and Administration). 
Congressional Record, Vol. 121 (1975) : 
July 26, agreed to by Senate. 
******* 

Authorizing additional expenditures by the Committee on Armed 
Services for routine purposes. (S. Res. 88) 

Legislative History 

Feb. 24, resolution reported without written report. 
Senate Report Xo. 94-72 (Committee on Rules and Administration). 
Congressional Record, Vol. 121 (1975) : 
April 14, agreed to by Senate. 

******* 

Disapproving construction projects on the island of Diego Garcia. 

' (S. Res. 160) 

This resolution would have expressed the Senate's disappropal of 
the proposed construction project on the island of Diego Garcia, the 
need for which was certified to by the President and the certification 
with respect to which was received by the Senate on May 12, 1975. 

Legislative History 

Senate Report No. 94-202 (Adverse report, Committee on Armed Services). 
Congressional Record. Vol. 121 (1975) : 

July 26. 28, considered and failed of passage in Senate. 

******* 

(30) 



31 

Additional Resolution Adopted 

To commend James R. Schlesinger for his services as Secretary 
of Defense. (S. Res. 303) 

This resolution commends James R. Schlesinger for his excellence 
in office, his intellectual honesty and personal Integrity, and for his 
courage and independence during his tenure as Secretary of Defense. 
The Senate formally expressed its conviction that the country and the 
free world owes a great debt of gratitude to Mr. Schlesinger for his 
untiring effoit to improve the efficiency of the Armed Forces, the co- 
hesiveness of American alliances, the wisdom of U.S. strategic policies 
and doctrine, and for his determination to convey to the American 
people the truth as he saw it and the sense of the future he so deeply 
believed they must understand. 

Legislative History 

Nov. 13, resolution adopted by Committee on Armed Services. 
Senate Report : None. 
Congressional Record, Vol. 121 (1975) : 
Nov. 18, considered and passed Senate. 



INVESTIGATIONS, HEARINGS, AND OTHER MATTERS 
NOT DIRECTLY PERTAINING TO LEGISLATION BE- 
FORE THE COMMITTEE 

Date of hearings : Person or subject 

Feb. 19, 1975 Briefing by William E. Colby, Director of Cen- 
tral Intelligence, on conditions worldwide. 
Executive, not printed. 

Mar. 6, 19T5 Committee received reports from Senators 

Nunn, Thurmond. Scott of Va.. and Bartlett 
on their visits to South Vietnam and Cam- 
bodia. Reports printed, but not proceedings 
of this executive session. 

Mar. 20, 19T5 Committee held executive hearing to receive 

testimony from Department of Defense wit- 
nesses on their program for modernization 
of the Saudi Arabian National Guard, in- 
cluding the Defense contract with the Vin- 
nell Corporation. Xot printed. 

April 19T5 Hearings on President's request for additional 

military assistance for South Vietnam. (See 
also S. 1451.) 

Apr. 8, 1975. — Received report by General 
Fred C. Weyand, Army Chief of Staff, 
on his trip to Vietnam to assess the situa- 
tion there. Executive, not printed. 
Apr. 15, 1975. — Received testimony of 
Honorable James R. Schlesinger, Secre- 
tary of Defense; General Fred C. 
Weyand, Army Chief of Staff; and Mr. 
Erich von Marbod, Principal Deputy 
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Comp- 
troller) : Open. 
•Apr. 17, 1975. — Committee met to discuss 
President's request. (General Weyand 
was present to answer questions.) All 
motions to authorize additional aid 
failed. Executive, not printed. 
July 10, 1975 — Committee received report from Senator Bart- 
lett concerning his trip to Berbera. Somalia, 
to assess Soviet military capability there. 
Report printed as committee print. Meeting- 
in executive session, not printed. 
Sept. 11 and 

Oct. 8,1975 Committee received testimony from Henry A. 

Kissinger, Secretary of State, on the United 
States role in the Egyptian-Israeli Sinai 
agreement. Executive, not printed. 
Dec. 16, 1975 — Armed Services Committee and Defense Ap- 
propriations Sub-Committee met jointly for 
an informal discussion with Honorable 
Shimon Peres, Defense Minister of IsraeL 
Executive ; not recorded. 

(32) 



ARMED SERVICES COMMITTEE STAFF 

T. Edward Braswell, Jr., Chief Counsel and Staff Director 

Phyllis A. Bacon, Assistant Chief Clerk 

Nancy J. Bearg, Professional Staff Member 4 

Joyce T. Campbell, Clerical Assistant 5 

Susan J. Clark, Clerical Assistant 

Doris S. Cline, Clerical Assistant 

Charles J. Conneely, Professional Staff Member 

Doris E. Connor, Clerical Assistant 

Christine E. Cowart, Clerical Assistant 

Charles Cromwell, Professional Staff Member 

Marie Fabrizio Dickinson, Clerical Assistant 

Hyman Fine, Professional Staff Member 

George H. Foster, Jr., Professional Staff Member 

John A. Goldsmith, Professional Staff Member 

Edward B. Kenne}', Professional Staff Member 

Mary G. Ketner, Clerical Assistant 

Jeanie Killgore, Clerical Assistant 1 

Don L. Lynch, Professional Staff Member 

W. Clark McFadden II, General Counsel 

Sheila O'Brien, Clerical Assistant 3 



Robert Q. Old, Professional Staff Member 

Ruth S. Price, Clerical Assistant 

James C. Smith, Professional Staff Member 

Larry K. Smith, Professional Staff Member 2 

Francis J. Sullivan, Professional Staff Member 

John T. Ticer, Chief Clerk 

Roberta A. Ljakovich, Research Assistant 

Carol L. Wilson, Clerical Assistant 

E. Christina Winters, Clerical Assistant 6 



Appointed : i May 19, 1975 ; 2 Sept. 3, 1975 ; a Nov. 24, 1975. 
Reigned : * Sept. 14, 1975 ; 5 Apr. 30, 1975 ; 6 May 31, 1975. 

(33) 



RULES OF PROCEDURE 

1. Regular meeting day and trine. The regular meeting day of the 
committee shall be each Thursday at 10 a.m.. unless the committee 
or the chairman directs otherwise. 

2. Additional meetings. The chairman may call such additional 
meetings as he deems necessary. 

3. Special meetings. Special meetings of the committee may be balled 
by a majority of the members of the committee in accordance with 
section 133(a) of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946. as 
amended by section 102(a) of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 
1070. 

±. Open meetings. All meetings of the committee shall be open to 
the public except executive sessions for marking up bills for voting 
or unless the committee by majority vote provides otherwise. 

5. Presiding officer. The chairman shall preside at all meetings and 
hearings of the committee except that in his absence the ranking ma- 
jority member present at the meeting or hearing shall preside unless 
by majority vote the committee provides otherwise. 

6. Quorum, (a) A majority of the members of the committee are 
required to be actually present to report a matter or measure from 
the committee. 

(b) Except as provided in subsection (a) and (c), and other than 
for the conduct of hearings, six members of the committee shall con- 
stitute a quorum for the transaction of such business as may be con- 
sidered by the committee. 

(c) Three members of the committee, one of whom shall be a member 
of the minority party, shall constitute a quorum for the purpose of 
taking sworn testimony, unless otherwise ordered by a majority of the 
full committee. 

(d) Proxy votes may nof be considered for the purpose of establish- 
ing a quorum. 

7. Proxy voting. Proxy voting shall be allowed on all measures and 
matters before the committee. The vote by proxy of any member of 
the committee may be counted for the purpose of reporting any meas- 
ure or matter to the Senate if the absent member casting such vote 
has been informed of the matter on which he is being recorded and 
has affirmatively requested that he be so recorded. 

8. Announcement of votes. The results of all rollcall votes taken in 
any meeting of the committee on any measure, or amendment thereto, 
shall be announced in the committee report, unless previously an- 
nounced by the committee. The announcement shall include a tabula- 
tion of the votes cast in favor and votes cast in opposition to each 
such measure and amendment by each member of the committee who 
was present at such meeting. 

0. Hearings, (a) Public notice shall be given of the date, place, and 
subject matter of any hearing to be held by the committee, or any 
subcommittee thereof, at least 1 week in advance of such hearing, 

(3-D 



35 

unless the committee or subcommittee determines thai gobcj cau^e 
exists for beginning such hearing at an earlier time. 

(b) Hearings may be initiated only by the specific authorization of 
the committee or subcommittee. 

(c) Hearings shall be held only in the District of Columbia unless 
specifically authorized to be held elsewhere by a majority vote of the 
committee or subcommittee conducting such healings. 

(d) Each hearing lie Id by the committee shall be open to the public 
except when the committee determines that the testimony to be taken 
at such hearing may relate to a matter of national security, may tend 
to reflect adversely on the character or reputation of the witness or 
any other individual, or may divulge matters deemed confidential 
under other provisions of law or regulations. 

(e) Witnesses appearing before the committee shall file with the 
clerk of the committee a written statement of his proposed testimony 
at least one day prior to a hearing at which he is to appear unless the 
chairman and the ranking minority member determine that there is 
good cause for the faliure of the witness to file such statement. 

(f) Confidential testimony taken or confidential material presented 
in a closed hearing of the committee or subcommittee or any report of 
the proceedings of such hearing shall not be made public in Avhole or 
in part or by way of summary unless authorized by a majority vote of 
the committee or subcommittee. 

(g) Any witness summoned to give testimony or evidence at a public 
or closed hearing of the committee or subcommittee may be accom- 
panied by counsel of his own choosing who shall be permitted at all 
times during such hearing to advise such witness of his legal rights. 

(h) Each subcommittee of the committee shall (1) fix the number of 
members that shall constitute a quorum of such subcommittee for the 
purpose of taking sworn testimony, (2) determine the circumstances 
under which subpoenas may be issued, and (3) the members over 
whose signature subpoenas may be issued. 

10. Nominations. Unless otherwise ordered by the committee, nomi- 
nations referred to the committee shall be held for at least 7 days 
before being voted on by the committee. Each member of the commit- 
tee shall be furnished a copy of all nominations referred to the 
committee. 

11. Real property transactions. Each member of the committee shall 
be furnished with a copy of the proposals of the Secretaries of the 
Army, Navy, and Air Force, submitted pursuant to section 2662 of 
title 10, United States Code, and with a copy of the proposals of the 
Director of the Office of Emergency Preparedness submitted pur- 
suant to section 43 of the act of August 10, 1956 (50 U.S.C. app. 
2285), regarding the proposed acquisition or disposition of property 
of an estimated price or rental of more than $50,000. Any member 
of the committee objecting to or requesting information on a pro- 
posed acquisition or disposal shall communicate his objection or request 
to the chairman of the committee within 20 days from the date of 
submission. 

12. Legislative calendar, (a) The clerk of the committee shall keep a 
printed calendar for the information of each committee member show- 
ing the bills introduced and referred to the committee and the status 
of such bills. Such calendar shall be revised from time to time to show 



36 

pertinent changes in such bills, the current status thereof, and new 
bills introduced and referred to the committee. A copy of each such 
version shall be furnished to each member of the committee. 

(b) Unless otherwise ordered, measures referred to the committee 
shall be referred by the clerk of the committee to the appropriate 
department or agency of the Government for reports thereon. 



PUBLICATIONS 
Hearings 

Cost Increase of the M60A1 Tank. (Hearing before the Subcommit- 
tee on General Legislation.) January 15, 1975: 30 pages. 

Fiscal Year 1976 and 197T Authorization for Military Procure- 
ment, Research and Development, and Active Duty, Selected Reserve 
and Civilian Personnel Strengths. Hearings on S. 920. 

Part 1 : Authorizations. February 5, 1975 : pages 1-365. 

Part 2 : Authorizations. February 7, 10, 11, 20, 1975 : pages 367-888. 

Part 3 : Manpower. February 24, 25, 26, 27, 28 ; March 4, 1975 : pages 
889-1707. 

Part 4: Research and Development. February 25, 27; March 4, 5, 
1975 : pages 1709-2167. 

Part 5: Manpower. March 6, 7, 14: April 7, 11, 1975: pages 2169- 
2636. 

Part 6 : Research and Development, March 7, 11, 17, 19, 21, 25, 1975 : 
pages 2637-3605. 

Part 7 : Authorizations. March 12, 13, 14 ; April 10, 1975 : pages 
3607-4030. 

Part 8 : Tactical Air Power. March 6, 10, 11, 12, 13, 1975 : pages 
4031-4474. 

Part 9 : Tactical Air Power. March 13, 14, 17, 18, 19, 1975 : pages 
4475-5122. 

Part 10: Research and Development. April 10, 11, 14, 15, 17. 21, 
1975 : pages 5123-5691. 

Soviet Compliance with Certain Provisions of the 1972 SALT I 
Agreements. (Hearing before Subcommittee on Arms Control.) 
March 6, 1975: 22 pages. 

Naval Petroleum and Strategic Energy Reserves. Hearing on S. 
594, S. 1113, and S.J. Res. 13 (Joint hearing before the Committee on 
Armed Services and the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs). 
March 11, 1975 : 167 pages. 

Military Construction Authorization, Fiscal Year 1976 and 197T. 
(Hearings on S. 1247 before Subcommittee on Military Construction 
Authorization.) April 8, 9, 11, 25, 1975 : 444 pages. 

Disapprove Construction Projects on the Island of Diego Garcia. 
Hearing on S. Res. 160. June 10, 1975 : 72 pages. 

Enforcer Aircraft. (Hearings before Subcommittee on Research and 
Development.) July 28, 30, 1975 : 149 pages. 

Reserve Call-Up. (Hearing on S. 2115 before Subcommittee on Man- 
power and Personnel.) July 30, 1975 : 35 pages. 

Independent Research and Development. (Joint hearings before 
Subcommittee on Research and Development of the Armed Services 
Committee and Subcommittee on Priorities and Economy in Govern- 
ment of the Joint Economic Committee.) September 17,24, 29, 1975: 
802 pages. 

(37) 



38 



National Security Council Membership for the Secretary of the 
Treasury. Hearing on S. 2350. September 26, 1975 : 7 pages. 

Northern Mariana Islands. (Hearing on H.J. Res. 549 before Sub- 
committee on General Legislation.) November 17, 1975: 180 pages. 

Emergency Marine Fisheries Protection Act of 1975. Hearing on 
military implications of S. 961. November 19, 1975 : 228 pages. 

Carbonyl Chloride Disposal. (Hearing on S. 2423 before Subcom- 
mittee on National Stockpile and Naval Petroleum Reserves.) No- 
vember 24, 1975 : 31 pages. 

Reports 



Number 

94-18 



94-95 



94-110 
94-146 



94-157 
94-202 
94-327 
94-329 



94-334 



94-376 
94-385 



94-423 



94-515 



94-560 



Concurrent Resolution Relating to the Establishment of the 
naval and maritime museum in Charleston, South Carolina 
(S. Con. Res. 9). Feb. 20, 1975 ; lp. 

Report on the Activities of the Committee on Armed Services. 
Apr. 25, 1975 ; 93p. 

Reinstatement of Retired Military Status to Alexander P. 
Butter-field (S. 182) .May 8, 1975 ; lip. 

Authorizing Appropriations, Fiscal Year 1976, and July- 
September, 1976, Transition Period for Military Procure- 
ment, Research and Development, and Active Duty, Se- 
lected Reserve, and Civilian Personnel Strengths (S. 920). 
May 19, 1975 ; 191p. 

Military Construction Authorization, Fiscal Year 1976 (S. 
1247). May 22, 1975 ;70p. 

Disapproving Construction Projects on the Island of Diego 
Garcia (S. Res. 160). June 18, 1975 ; 22p. 

Naval Petroleum Reserves Petroleum Act of 1975 (S. 2173). 
July 24, 1975; I7p. 

Extension of Authoritv for Special Pay for Nuclear Quali- 
fied Naval Officers (S. 2114). July 24, 1975; 8p. 

Authorizing Appropriations, Fiscal Year 1976 and the Period 
Beginning July 1, 1976, and Ending Sept. 30, 1976, for 
Military Procurement, Research and Development, Active 
Duty, Reserve, and Civilian Personnel Strength Levels, and 
Military Training Student Loads (1st Conference Report 
on H.R. 6674). July 25, 1975; 73p. 

Military Construction Authorization, Fiscal Year 1976 (Con- 
ference Report on S. 1247). Sept. 17, 1975; 36p. 

Authorizing Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1976 and the 
Period Beginning July 1, 1976, Ending Sept. 30, 1976, for 
Military Procurement, Research and Development, Active 
Duty, Reserve, and Civilian Personnel Strength Levels, 
and Military Training Student Loads (2nd Conference 
Report on H.R. 6674) . Sept. 19, 1975 ; 75p. 

National Security Council Membership for the Secretarv of 
the Treasury (S. 2350). October 8, 1975; 4p. 

Fisheries Management and Conservation Act (S. 961) . Dec. 8, 
1975; 14p. 

Making Certain Annuity Entitlement Provisions for Sur- 
vivors of Non-Regular Retired Personnel Retroactive to 
November 1, 1953 (S. 2090). Dec, 15, 1975; 3p. 



39 

Number 

94-561 Authorizing the Appointment of Marine Corps Officers to 
be Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps in the Grade 
of General (S. 2117). Dec. 15, 1975: 9p. 

94-562 Enabling the President to Authorize the Involuntary Order 
to Active Duty of Selected Reservists for a Limited Period 
Without a Declaration of War or National Emergency (S. 
2115). Dec. 15, 1975; 23p. 

Nominations 

Nomination of Joseph Laitin to be Assistant Secretar}^ for Public 
Affairs, 1 )epartment of Defense. Feb. 5, 1975 ; 5p. 

Nominations of Victor V. Veysey to be an Assistant Secretary of the 
Army for Civil Works and Donald G. Brotzrnan to be an Assistant 
Secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs. Mar. G, 
1975; lip. 

Nomination of Albert B. Fletcher Jr. to be a Judge of the U.S. 
Court of Military Appeals. Apr. 10, 1975 ; 5p. 

Nomination of Lt. Gen. Louis H. Wilson, Jr. to be Commandant. 
U.S. Marine Corps. May 6, 1975 ; 9p. 

Nomination of Martin R. Hoffman to be Secretary of the Ann v. 
July 30, 1975 ; 5p. 

Nomination of Edward Alan Miller to be an Assistant Secretary 
•of the Army. Nov. 12, 1 975 ; 4p. 

Nomination of Donald Rumsfeld to be Secretary of Defense. Nov. 
12-13, 1975: 106p. 

Nomination of Richard A. Wiley to be General Counsel of the 
Department of Defense. Dec. 10, 1975 ; 5p. 

Nomination of George Bush to be Director of Central Intelligence. 
Dee. 15-16, 1975; 94p. 

Nominations of Robert Ellsworth to be Deputy Secretary of De- 
fense; William I. Greener to be Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
Public Affairs; Matthew J. Perry, Jr. to be a judge of the U.S. Court 
■of Military Appeals ; and Thomas C. Reed to be Secretarv of the A i r 
Force. Dec. 16, 1975 ; 25p. 

Committee Prints 

Viei riaE Aid : The Painful Options. Feb. 12, 1975 ; ISp. 

Asia/Pacific : Policy and Forces. Feb. 22, 1975 ; 31p. 

Southeast Asia. Mar. 14, 1975 ; 8p. 

Soviet Military Capability on Berbera, Somalia. July 15, 1975; 29p. 

Activities Related to Resettlement of Refugees in Somalia. Sept. 2, 

1975; 5p. 
Defense Officer Personnel Management Act: An Analysis. Dec. 18, 

1975 ; 128p. 



NOMINATIONS REFERRED TO COMMITTEE 



Date considered by committee 



Name 



Date 
confirmed 
by Senate 



May 21, 1975 Augustine, Norman R., of Virginia, to be Under Secretary of the May 22, 1975 

Army, vice Herman R. Staudt, resigned. No hearing held. 
Mar. 6, 1975 __ Brotzman, Donald G., of Colorado, to be Assistant Secretary of the Mar. 7, 1975 

Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs, vice M. David Lowe, 

resigned. Approved in executive session. 
Dec. 15, 16, 18, 1975 Bush, George, of Texas, to be Director of Central Intelligence, vice ] 

William Egan Colby. 
Dec. 16, 18, 1975 Ellsworth, Robert, of New York, to be Deputy Secretary of Defense Dec. 19, 1975 

(new position). The remander of the term expiring May 1, 1986, 

vice Robert M. Duncan, resigned. 
Apr. 10, 1975 Fletcher, Albert B., Jr., of Kansas, to be a judge of the U.S. Court of Apr. 14, 1975 

Military Appeals for the remainder of the term expiring May 1, 

1986, vice Robert M. Duncan, resigned. 
Dec. 16, 18, 1975 Greener, William I., of Virginia, to be AssistantSecretary of Defense Dec. 19,1975 

for Public Affairs, vice Joseph Laitin, resigned. 
July 30, 1975 Hoffmann, Martin R., of Virginia, to be Secretary of the Army vice Aug, 1, 1975 

Howard H. Callaway, resigned. 
Feb. 5, 10, 1975 Laitin, Joseph, of Maryland, to be Assistant Secretary of Defense Feb. 12, 1975 

for Public Affairs, vice Jerry W. Friedmen, resigned 
Nov. 12, 13, 1975 Miller, Edward Alan, of Massachusetts, to be Assistant Secretary Nov. 14, 1975 

of the Army for Research and Development, vice Norman R. 

Augustine, elevated. 
Mar. 20, 1975 Parfitt, Maj. Gen. Harold R., to.be Governor of the Canal Zone for a Mar. 20, 1975 

term of 4 years, vice Maj. Gen. David S. Parker. No hearing held. 
Dec. 16, 18, 1975 Perry, Matthew J., Jr., of South Carolina, to be a judge of the U.S. Dec. 19, 1975 

Court of Military Appeals for the remainder of the term expiring 

May 1, 1981, vice Robert Emmett Quinn, retired. 
Dec. 16, 18, 1975 Reed, Thomas C, of California, to be Secretary of the Air Force, Dec. 19, 1975 

vice John L. McLucas. 
Nov. 12, 13, 1975 Rumsfeld, Donald, of Illinois, to be Secretary of Defense, vice Nov. 13,1975 

James R Schlesinger. 
July 24, 1975 Slay, Maj. Gen. Alton D., USAF, to be Lt. Genera!. (No hearing held; Oct. 28, 1975 

nominee not present). 
Mar. 6, 1975 _ Veysey, Victor V., of California, to be Assistant Secretary of the Mar* 7, 1975 

Army for Civil Works (new position). Approved in executivej 

session. 
Dec. 10, 12, 1975 Wiley, Richard A., of Massachusetts, to be General Counsel of the De:. 5, 1975 

Department of Defense, vice Martin R. Hoffmann, elevated. 
May 6, 1975 Wilson, Lt. Gen Louis H., Jr., to be Commandant of the Marine May'" 7, 1975 

Corps with the rank of general for a period of 4 years. Approved 

in executive session. 



(40) 



NOMINATIONS FOR PROMOTIONS IN THE ARMED 

FORCES 

The Committee considered nominations for promotions in the armed 
services. Nominations submitted to the Senate by the President for 
confirmation resulted in the following : 

January H through December 19, 1075 

Army nominations, totaling 15,738, disposed of as follows: 

Confirmed 15, 737 

Unconfirmed 1 

Navy nominations, totaling 26,096, disposed of as follows: 

Confirmed 23, 738 

Unconfirmed 2, 35S 

Air Force nominations, totaling 23,691, disposed of as follows: 

Confirmed 22, 707 

Unconfirmed 984 

Marine Corps nominations, totaling 6,073, disposed of as follows : 

Confirmed 6, 073 

The Committee also reported favorably on 13 civilian nominations 
which were confirmed by the Senate. 

(41) 



INFORMATION REGARDING APPOINTMENT OF BOARDS 
OF VISITORS TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY, 
NAVAL, AND AIR FORCE ACADEMIES 



Public Law 816 of the 80th Congress provides a uniform procedure 
for the appointment of members of the Boards of Visit ors of the Mili- 
tary and Naval Academies, and provides that there shall be appointed 
on or before the last day of every year Boards of Visitors to each of 
the Academies to be constituted as follows : 
Seriate: 

Chairman of the Armed Services Committee or his designee. 

*1 Senator. 

*2 members of the Senate Appropriations Committee. 

*(Tobe appointed by the Vice President) 
House: 

Chairman of the Armed Services Committee or his designee.. 

**2 Congressmen. 

**2 members of the House Appropriations Committee. 

**(To he appointed by the Speaker of the House) 

Presidential : 

6 persons, to serve for a 3-year term. 2 new members appointed 
each year. Each Board to visit respective Academy once 
annually. 

Board of Visitors to: 

Military Academy: (Title 10, U.S.C., sec. 4355.) 

1975. — Senators Stennis (ex officio) (Senator Scott of Va. for 
Senator Stennis) , Pastore, Leahv, Mathias. 
Naval Academy: (Title 10, U.S.C., sec. 6968.) 

1975. — Senators Stennis (ex officio) (Senator Culver for Senator 
Stennis) , Hollings. Brooke, Beall. 
Air Force Academy: (Title 10. U.S.C., sec. 9355.) 

1975. — Senators Stennis (ex officio) (Senator Hart of Colo, for 
Senator Stennis) , McGee, Stevens, Griffin. 

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